{“main-title”:{“component”:”hc_title”,”id”:”main-title”,”subtitle”:””,”title_content”:{“component”:”hc_title_empty”,”id”:”title-empty”},”title”:”Are You Trading Securely? Insights into the (In)Security of Mobile Trading Apps”},”section_5ZtkF”:{“component”:”hc_section”,”id”:”section_5ZtkF”,”section_width”:””,”animation”:””,”animation_time”:””,”timeline_animation”:””,”timeline_delay”:””,”timeline_order”:””,”vertical_row”:””,”box_middle”:””,”css_classes”:””,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:””,”section_content”:[{“component”:”hc_column”,”id”:”column_vtfQF”,”column_width”:”col-md-12″,”animation”:””,”animation_time”:””,”timeline_animation”:””,”timeline_delay”:””,”timeline_order”:””,”css_classes”:””,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:”padding-top: 50px; padding-bottom: 30px; color: #FFF;”,”main_content”:[{“component”:”hc_title_tag”,”id”:”44y55″,”css_classes”:”text-center “,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:””,”text”:”Are You Trading Securely? Insights into the (In)Security of Mobile Trading Apps”,”tag”:”h2″},{“component”:”hc_niche_content_box_testimonials”,”id”:”2kKDj”,”css_classes”:””,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:””,”image”:””,”title”:”By Alejandro Hernández”,”box_style”:”style_1″,”subtitle”:””,”text”:””}]}],”section_settings”:{“component”:”hc_section_image”,”id”:”section-image”,”image”:”https://smartconcil.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/bgNoticia5-1-1800×1193.jpg|1272|1920|903″,”full_screen”:false,”full_screen_height”:””,”parallax”:false,”bleed”:””,”ken_burn”:””,”bg_pos”:””,”overlay”:”transparent-dark”}},”section_start”:{“component”:”hc_section”,”id”:”section_start”,”section_width”:””,”animation”:””,”animation_time”:””,”timeline_animation”:””,”timeline_delay”:””,”timeline_order”:””,”vertical_row”:””,”box_middle”:””,”css_classes”:”no-paddings text-justify “,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:”margin-top: 30px; margin-bottom: 30px;”,”section_content”:[{“component”:”hc_column”,”id”:”xCrv3″,”column_width”:”col-md-12″,”animation”:””,”animation_time”:””,”timeline_animation”:””,”timeline_delay”:””,”timeline_order”:””,”css_classes”:””,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:””,”main_content”:[{“component”:”hc_wp_editor”,”id”:”g0vNH”,”css_classes”:””,”custom_css_classes”:””,”custom_css_styles”:””,”editor_content”:”The days of open shouting on the trading floors of the NYSE, NASDAQ, and other stock exchanges around the globe are gone. With the advent of electronic trading platforms and networks, the exchange of financial securities now is easier and faster than ever; but this comes with inherent risks.\n\nFrom the beginning, bad actors have also joined Wall Street’s party, developing clever models for fraudulent gains. Their efforts have included everything from fictitious brokerage firms that ended up being Ponzi schemes[1] to organized cells performing Pump-and-Dump scams.[2] (Pump: buy cheap shares and inflate the price through sketchy financials and misleading statements to the marketplace through spam, social media and other technological means; Dump: once the price is high, sell the shares and collect a profit).\n\nWhen it comes to security, it’s worth noting how banking systems are organized when compared to global exchange markets. In banking systems, the information is centralized into one single financial entity; there is one point of failure rather than many, which make them more vulnerable to cyberattacks.[3] In contrast, global exchange markets are distributed; records of who owns what, who sold/bought what, and to whom, are not stored in a single place, but many. Like matter and energy, stocks and other securities cannot be created from the void (e.g. a modified database record within a financial entity). Once issued, they can only be exchanged from one entity to another. That said, the valuable information as well as the attack surface and vectors in trading environments are slightly different than those in banking systems.\n\nOver the years I’ve used the desktop and web platforms offered by banks in my country with limited visibility of available trade instruments. Today, accessing global capital markets is as easy as opening a Facebook account through online brokerage firms. This is how I gained access to a wider financial market, including US-listed companies. Anyone can buy and sell a wide range of financial instruments on the secondary market (e.g. stocks, ETFs, etc.), derivatives market (e.g. options, binary options, contracts for difference, etc.), forex markets, or the avant-garde cryptocurrency markets.\n\nMost banks with investment solutions and the aforementioned brokerage houses offer mobile platforms to operate in the market. These apps allow you to do things including, but not limited to:\n

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  • Fund your account via bank transfers or credit card
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  • Keep track of your available equity and buying power (cash and margin balances)
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  • Monitor your positions (securities you own) and their performance (profit)
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  • Monitor instruments or indexes
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  • Give buy/sell orders
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  • Create alerts or triggers to be executed when certain thresholds are reached
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  • Receive real-time news or video broadcasts
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  • Stay in touch with the trading community through social media and chats
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\nNeedless to say, whether you’re a speculator, a very active intra-day trader, or simply someone who likes to follow long-term buy-and-hold strategies, every single item on the previous list must be kept secret and only known by and shown to its owner.\n\n \n\nRead original note“}]}],”section_settings”:””},”scripts”:{},”css”:{“content_box”:”css/content-box.css”},”css_page”:””,”template_setting”:{“settings”:{“id”:”settings”}},”template_setting_top”:{},”page_setting”:{“settings”:[“lock-mode-off”]},”post_type_setting”:{“settings”:{“image”:”https://smartconcil.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/bgNoticia5-1-1800×1193.jpg|1272|1920|903″,”excerpt”:””,”extra_1″:””,”extra_2″:””,”icon”:{“icon”:””,”icon_style”:””,”icon_image”:””}}}}